Thin-leaf stringybark

Good kind stringybark

Eucalyptus eugenioides (formerly E. wilkinsonia)

Thin-leaf stringybark, or "Good kind stringy" (Anderson, p. 152, Goodacre, p. 45) is found on the eastern side of the Great Dividing Range, and in the drier areas North Coast NSW. It flowers every three to five years in the autumn. It flowered profusely in 1990, with hives breeding well and producing a good box of honey. Three samples tested (Table 7) resulted in 22% to 23% crude protein and a well balanced amino-acid profile for honey bees. Bees collect large quantities of this pollen, but extensive trapping is undesirable as it is the last good pollen before winter. Beekeepers whose bees work this tree, always find their bees breed satisfactorly and overwinter in a strong condition. It is for this reason the tree is known as Good kind stringybark.

Table 7: Thin-leaf stringybark, Eucalyptus eugenioides
Amino-acid
Minimum % of Amino-Acid from De Groot (1953)
Drake

April 1990

Drake

March 1990

Drake 

April 1990

Threonine 3.0     3.5
Valine 4.0     4.7
Methionine 1.5
No
No
1.7
Leucine 4.5     6.3
Iso-leucine 4.0
Amino
Amino
3.9*
Phenylalanine 2.5     3.6
Lysine 3.0
Acid
Acid
6.1
Histidine 1.5     2.1
Arginine 3.0
Test
Test
5.8
Tryptophan 1.0     2.7
Crude protein  
23.0%
22.1%
22.9%

* Low level of this amino-acid


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